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‘Scythian Gold’ Collection Returns to Ukraine

Gold Skif

The Amsterdam Court of Appeal yesterday delivered its judgment in the case of the “Scythian gold” collection in favour of Ukraine.

The collection embraces unique archaeological treasures: precious stones, weapons, valuable Chinese lacquer boxes, and  gold jewelry of the Scythians. The exhibits are estimated at more than one million euros.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine believes that the ruling of the Amsterdam Court of Appeal is rightful as it returns to Ukraine a part of its national code.

“Scythian gold will return home. This is a great victory. We will get back not just museum exhibits but a part of our national code, relics that testify to thousands of years of our history,” said foreign minister Kuleba.

According to him, the team of diplomats of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine and representatives of the Ministry of Justice and the Ministry of Culture “worked hard” for several years to return the Scythian gold to Ukraine.

In turn, Russia will soon file a cassation appeal to the Supreme Court of the Netherlands against the judgment of the Amsterdam Court of Appeal. This was stated by Alexander Molokhov, deputy head of the so-called working group on international legal issues at the Permanent Mission of Crimea under the President of the Russian Federation.

In 2014, the Scythian gold collection had been delivered to the Allard Pearson Museum in Amsterdam as part of the exhibition entitled “Crimea – the Gold and Secrets of the Black Sea” at a time when Russian troops were invading Crimea and occupying the peninsula.

Natalia Tolub

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